About your Search

20130416
20130424
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4
? >> chris, there's a lot of technological advances from the old days of, you know, the mugshot photo book. certainly there's facial recognition software. all of those techniques, you know, advanced techniques will be used in this case. and i agree with the other comments made that it's not going to take long for somebody to recognize these people. >> yeah, there's an interesting database, chris, ever since 2003, we've been taking photographs and digital fingerprints of people coming into this country under u.s. visit. i think there are over 80 million digital photographs there. i just don't know. maybe one of your guests will tell whether or not the fbi -- >> how many? >> 80 million. everybody who's come across at an airport internationally, we have fingerprints and a digital photograph. >> everyone who has gone internationally -- >> no, everybody who's come into the united states. >> as a visitor. >> as a visitor. under u.s. visit. we got their digital photograph and we have their -- a couple fingerpri fingerprints. >> wouldn't they match that up if they have these visual images? >> i do
, not if, when bad actors get their hands on the same technology that we have, and use it in terrible ways, we really lose our ability to lean on our allies and world bodies and ask them to sanction or punish these bad actors for an unaccountable drone program when the mantra of our drone program is what drone program, right? >> if you have a program that is operating in the shadows, eventually you're going to have problems with it. right now, we use drones primarily as we've been about by the cia to kill al qaeda members. and i use that term loosely. sometimes these are al qaeda affiliates, people inspired by the same goals as al qaeda. well, other countries eventually will have armed drones and they can be using them against human rights activists. and we won't have a lot of moral ground to stand on. if we've been operating in the shadows. it goes back to 9/11. 9/11 happened. it was a horrible incident and the united states wasn't exactly prepared to deal with it. the military had plans for conventional war. didn't have plans for defeating a stateless organization that was more or less b
technology, it's the only way to track them. if we invested what we should've in the air traffic system, we would have -- may not solve all of chuck's problems, but a much faster, flowing system. >> by the way, if you modernize it, you can cut back on some of the workforce permanently and save money there. that's the other issue. it's very labor intensive because of the issue that steve just described. >> before we go to break, the president is dining tonight with members of the senate, all women, isn't that nice? >> that's great. >> chuck todd, thank you. we'll see you at 9:00 on the "daily rundown." >> i'm surprised that didn't get ugly just then. >> right. >> that's great. >> we went to counseling. >>> up next, steve rattner has charts on signs of a spring slowdown. more "morning joe" when we come back. but i wondered what a i tcustomer thought? is great, hi nia... nice to meet you nia, i'm mike. what do you drive? i have a ford explorer, i love my car. and you're treating it well? yes i am. there are a lot of places you could take your explorer for service, why do you bring it back to t
time, you could argue that it means a decrease in personnel. because you're using technology, using cameras to replace, you know, eyeballs. but i don't think we've come to that determination. we're down -- the police department is down 6,000 police officers than where we were 11 years ago. so we've already sort of paid the price. and we're using to a certain extent technology to plug the gaps. we're increasing the number of cameras that we have. one of the things that we're doing, we had it in motion prior to the boston marathon. but we want to increase the number of mobile cameras that we have so we can put them up at events and then move them to other events. along our marathon route, we have 220 cameras. but most of them are on bridges. we want to increase at least the public sector cameras that we have along that route. >> all right. new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, thank you very much. it's always good to see you. >> thank you for the great job you keep doing for the city. >> thank you. >>> a new book on afghanistan that's not so good. president hamid karzai had to
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)